Beneath God’s Tear

Halley's Comet in 1682 (Source: Wikipedia)

Halley’s Comet in 1682 (Source: Wikipedia)

On my pallet in the hold
of The Friends’ Adventure,
I hear their lamentations
above deck. The sun’s
dropped behind the shelf
toward our new home,
but something like daylight
shines here upon my family.

I tell Rachel this is a sign
from our Creator
that we are like Magi,
following a star to
a new Bethlehem,
where all may worship
in peace as he will.

I don’t approve of what
others call us, but
this September night,
seaman, farmer, heathen and Christian,
stand beneath God’s tear
falling from the sky,
and know what it means
to be a Quaker.

Here’s another 100-word drabble story-poem, this time based on a cool time and place prompt from Kellie Elmore:
You find yourself in the lower level of an old ship. A calendar on the wall says 1682. There is a small window, and the view is nothing but open sea and a setting sun. There is a staircase and you can see daylight at the top…
 That played right into this history nerd’s shaking hands. In 1682, William Penn began sending ships full of members of The Society of Friends off to settle what would soon be known as Pennsylvania. In the September of that year, the comet that became famous as Halley’s Comet hung in the skies as shown in that contemporary illustration up there and raised quite a stir in Europe.
I put those two facts together and imagined how George Pownall, a passenger on one of those ships, The Friends’ Adventure, would try to explain it to his daughter, Rachel. That’s how I came up with Beneath God’s Tear.
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3 thoughts on “Beneath God’s Tear

  1. Joe. This read to me like a classic poem. A beautiful composition of words weaved by one of the late greats. Your pen is something to marvel, and I envy your ability. Sighhhh ♥ Always a true pleasure reading you. Always. Wow.
    Much much love.
    Kellie

    • Thank you, Kell. The prompt seemed so specific to the history, after a day of thinking about the crossing of those historic streams, the poem practically wrote itself. The hard part was cutting it to 100 words. I think maybe there’s one of my histfic stories distilled within it. Maybe someday. Thank you, love. jh

  2. As always, your weaving of history captures me and carries me through this piece. I totally love this, and can only imagine how ‘awe-stricken’ and maybe even a bit ‘fear stricken’ those who saw this incredible sight would have been Beautifully done, Joe.

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